Garden Bloggers Foliage Day in my east facing garden

My east facing garden relies more on foliage than flowers but thats fine by me.

Foliage in my garden

Foliage in my garden

The view above is from the dining room window, the place we sit together to eat and share our day or use the table with laptops to work from home, do homework, catch up with emails and sometimes blog. We sit here too watching the birds and any pollinators who come this far up into the shadier parts of the garden. The foliage is home to lots of insects and birds and there are some mice too who eat up the fallen bird seed. Hydrangea petiolaris, Dentata ivy, Aucuba, Jacquemontii birch, box, a golden hop which twines up through the hidden Amelanchier and onto the bird feeder. In late May and June foxgloves are some of the few flowers in this border. And now my neighbour has treated her Viburnham opulus to a dose of nematodes we have wonderful blazing red autumn colour rather than the tatty net curtain leaves that used to hang over into my garden and drive me nuts.

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Autumn colour especially for Christina

Today, Christina who writes a wonderful, engaging, knowledgable and generous blog Creating my own garden of the Hesperides has written her 500th blog post which coincides with her hosting the GBFD meme on the 22nd of each month,  please take a look at Christina’s post and others who have joined in to celebrate.

27 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers Foliage Day in my east facing garden

  1. Thank you for such a glowing description Julie, your praise took my breathe away.Your garden is the perfect example of the importance of foliage in all of our gardens (not just those that face east. Thank you for joining in my celebration post for GBFD. Christina

    • Hi Christina, I enjoy your blog very much its been really inspiring for me. Now I have started I am looking forward to joining in with your GBFD again. 🙂

    • Thanks, it manages itself pretty much and there is a great log pile under the shrubs for any wildlife who want to make it home and is a lovely spot for birds to come and feed and forage.

  2. A lovely combination of foliage. Did you plant your golden hops from seed? I used to admire the golden hops in the rose garden of Drum Castle but when I tried plain hops they were a dull failure. Amelia

    • Hi Amelia, my husband bought me a golden hop plant about 20 years ago in our last house, it moved with us here and from then its been easily split and divided and given as gifts, its reliable although if its too dry at its roots, growth is stunted and it can occassionally get a little moth eaten. Like you I do not spray, so just pick off any leaves if I am in the mind to do so.

      • Ha! We have been misinformed (at Wisley no less) that you grew hops from seeds when we were looking for golden hops. That is good to know you can get plants and they are perennial.

      • I think you can do both but I haven’t tried by seed, I just keep on dividing the original one, we have several in the garden now – its a very useful plant.

    • Thanks, there are parts which do need some attention but I like to leave as much as possible standing over winter for wildlife to shelter and just tidy a little now and then.

    • Thanks Susie, there are no floral showstoppers here, but its constancy is relaxing and we get a great deal of enjoyment from the birds who visit this spot.

    • My neighbours overhanging Viburnham has been a beautiful red for about 4 weeks now but elsewhere leaves are subtle and taking their time to turn, its been a gentle Autumn for us so far. 🙂

    • Hi Chloris, its a veteran and very healthy Guelder rose, a couple of years ago it was treated with nematodes and its looked fantastic every autumn since then.

    • Thanks, that virburnham is the native V.opulus – Guelder rose that looks wonderful in lots of hedgerows right now. I had a V. opulus ‘snowball’ that I cut down and dug out in a fit of despair after a couple of years of Viburnham beetle damage. Like you I wish I had tried nematodes on that plant too.

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