18 thoughts on “Wordless Wednesday – Picking Poppies by Floodlight – Tower of London

    • We did Marian, we took part in the planting early on and were a small part of the picking team again last saturday. Apparently 11,000 people volunteered all together and they have now sold all of the Poppies for the 6 charities it was in aid of.

    • Paul Cummins and Tom Piper had such vision, amazing to have envisaged all of this, they must be delighted to have sold all of the Poppies and the public to have been so engaged.

    • I had a few I wanted to put on, but can’t currently get to grips with a Gallery, I saw Cathy’s post last night but time was not on my side to do something similar, a winter project I think!

    • Hi Annette, yes I agree, we went up early on, so missed the display at its best but have been really enjoying everyones photos.I bet in person that was very moving. I understand they are keeping a small display at the Tower and some are going on a tour, but I’m not certain. Its wonderful that the idea turned into something so spectacular and that so many charities will benefit.

  1. What a moving image, of an imaginative and moving installation.
    Poppies, mud and dying light. All the captured images of this event have really added to its power of remembrance, (perhaps beyond the artists’ dreams?)…as I guess will the poppies in their far flung new homes. How wonderful to have been personally involved in this,
    BW
    Julian

    • I think the creators and organisers must be thrilled at how this moving display has engaged the public on so many levels. And of course its also raised a great deal of money for charity. We had watched an interview with Paul Cumins who described the event as a whole piece of living art to include those watching Poppies being placed in the moat. We did not see any of the nightly Last Post ceremonies, which must have been a powerfully moving.

    • I took some too of the areas that were totally cleared of Poppies but they seemed to desolate to post on here, it was muddy and bare and even though the area was surrounded by folk watching from above the moat, the images just looked so sad.

  2. I thought this was one of the most important art works I have seen in ages. Just brilliant. Thank you so much for participating and making it happen. Great capture.

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