Wordless Wednesday – Carpets of Bluebells with my Faithful Friend

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Archie our Labrador, enjoying Spring Bluebells

National Trust Ashridge Estate Native Bluebells

National Trust Ashridge Estate, Hertfordshire -Native Bluebells

National Trust Ashridge Estate Native Bluebells

National Trust Ashridge Estate, Hertfordshire – Native Bluebells

Archie, taking in the scent of Bluebells

Archie, taking in the scent of Bluebells

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ashridge-estate/trails/three-in-one-bluebell-walk-at-ashridge

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ashridge-estate/features/protecting-the-bluebells-at-ashridge

http://www.wildlifebcn.org/news/2016/04/04/bluebell-barcoding-day

http://publicengagement.wellcomegenomecampus.org/page/bluebell-survey-2016

http://www.kew.org/science-conservation/plants-fungi/hyacinthoides-non-scripta-bluebell

Wordless Wednesday – Spring Blackthorn Blossom

Blackthorn Blossom

Native Hedgerow plant – Blackthorn Blossom – Prunus spinosa

No pollinators = No Sloes for Sloe Gin.

109 species of insect are associated with Blackthorn , including the rare Black Hair Streak Butterfly. As an early native flowering hedgerow plant, Blackthorn provides valuable nectar and pollen for bees and other pollinators. The foliage which appears after the flowers is food for many moth caterpillars. Birds, including Nightingales and Blackbirds nest within the thorny dense thickets and as part of the food web, eat the caterpillars and other insects on the leaves. Birds also feast on the sloe berries in the Autumn.