GBFD – September and a gradual change to Autumn Colour

Its been a while since I reported on foliage in my own garden. In fact 11 months! 3 years ago we planted some new trees, 3 Chanticleer Pears, a mystery Rowan, 1 Double white Hawthorn – Crataegus laevigata Plena and 3 new Apple Trees. The Chanticleers were put in to screen a new neighbours floor to roof apex windows, complete with balcony. My family is not given to naked trips around the garden but we do like our privacy. The Chanticleers are beginning to fill out nicely, they are the first to leaf and the last to fall, with a wonderful late Autumn colour. So far though its only our Mystery Rowan which is on the turn.

Mystery Rowan

Mystery Rowan

I had ordered a Kashmir Rowan – Sorbus cashmiriana Hedl which is supposed to have white Berries and very beautiful leaves, as I planted bare root, it was not until Spring that I began to think something was not right, the leaves were plain and in the second Autumn there were lots of small orange/red berries. Clearly not a Kashmir. It did not flower this Spring, so no berries at all this Autumn. But today when its raining, grey and cold, the leaves are shining with colour.

Last Autumn's Berries

Last Autumn’s Berries

Elsewhere, I grow several golden Hops, one is placed to cover a deciduous Corkscrew Hazel – Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’ which has extremely ugly leaves, but in the winter when the catkins are caught by the low sun, I am much more happy with its placing. I cut the stems too for my version of a Christmas Tree.

Golden Hop on Twisted Hazel

Golden Hop – Humulus lupus ‘Aureus’ winding through Corkscrew Hazel

Another plant that really comes into its own in the Autumn is Leucothoe, I am fairly sure this one was originally labelled ‘Royal Ruby’, a non native, originating in the USA, commonly called Switch Ivy and Dog Hobble. I wonder why either common name came about?

Looking through the window on a wet morning

Looking through the window on a wet morning

Lastly, as its too wet to go further afield with my camera today, in the group at the bottom is an unnamed Oxalis, purchased at Hughenden Manor, where they have it underplanted in tubs of Heuchera, I may be unleashing a thug but in the meantime am enjoying its dainty leaves.

Unnamed Oxalis

Unnamed Oxalis

With grateful thanks to Christina, for hosting Garden Bloggers Foliage Day, GBFD. Please take a look at Christina’s adventurous garden changes and other folks contributions too.

Happy GBFD!

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day in my east facing garden

My east facing garden relies more on foliage than flowers but thats fine by me.

Foliage in my garden

Foliage in my garden

The view above is from the dining room window, the place we sit together to eat and share our day or use the table with laptops to work from home, do homework, catch up with emails and sometimes blog. We sit here too watching the birds and any pollinators who come this far up into the shadier parts of the garden. The foliage is home to lots of insects and birds and there are some mice too who eat up the fallen bird seed. Hydrangea petiolaris, Dentata ivy, Aucuba, Jacquemontii birch, box, a golden hop which twines up through the hidden Amelanchier and onto the bird feeder. In late May and June foxgloves are some of the few flowers in this border. And now my neighbour has treated her Viburnham opulus to a dose of nematodes we have wonderful blazing red autumn colour rather than the tatty net curtain leaves that used to hang over into my garden and drive me nuts.

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Autumn colour especially for Christina

Today, Christina who writes a wonderful, engaging, knowledgable and generous blog Creating my own garden of the Hesperides has written her 500th blog post which coincides with her hosting the GBFD meme on the 22nd of each month,  please take a look at Christina’s post and others who have joined in to celebrate.